FREE PICK UP on all Testing Kits.

Menu

Drinks Machines

2 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction

2 Item(s)

per page

Grid  List 

Set Descending Direction

Drinks machines are commonplace nowadays wherever people gather. They come in a variety of formats, such as:-

  • Bottled drinking water units
  • Mains fed drinking water units
  • Vending machines

Generally these machines are well designed and manufactured to a high standard. Unfortunately, water quality is a common issue, usually due the operator failing to maintain a hygienic maintenance regime. Typical problems arise from:-

Failing to sanitise the neck of new bottles on changeover, these bottles will have been picked up by at least 10 different hands before swapping out the empty bottle. It only needs one hand to have traces of faecal matter to contaminate the supply.

Untrained cleaners cleaning the dispensing nozzles with ordinary cloths, the same cloths which they used to wipe wash hand basin taps in toilets - again introducing faecal matter onto the outlet of the drinks machine.

Failing to regularly sanitise the dispensers on beverage vending machines, splashes from a drink will leave ingredients (sugar, milk etc) on the nozzle which provides the nutrients for bacteria to grow.

Routine laboratory analysis from your vending machine or drinking water unit is a back-up check on your maintenance systems as well as ensuring your staff and visitors always enjoy good quality drinks.

The tests which AquaCert perform are the same as for ordinary drinking water, that is you can choose between two methods of sample collection.

Pre-Flush - Take the sample without any preparation of the nozzle to establish the bacteriological quality of the drink that your staff/visitors are consuming.

Post-Flush - Sanitise the dispensing nozzle and flush before collecting the sample. This result then tells you what the quality of the water is inside the unit. (Our test kit include the materials to santise the outlet).

Note
Drinks from Vending machines have different standards from drinking water. They are classed as a 'food' and fall under the Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations 1995 which allows for much higher bacteria concentrations than the drinking water regulations.

Help, Share, Contact

Sign In



Forgot your password?


Create an account

  • View order history
  • Download test certificates
  • View subscriptions
Loading...